Wednesday, 10 April 2013

Pravesh Pass Certificate


Scouts And Guides Prayer Song , Flag Song

Scouts And Guides Prayer Song , Flag Song 

Prayer Song


DAYA KAR DAAN BHAKTI KA HAMEN PARMATMA DENA ,
DAYA KARNA HAMARI AATMA MEIN SHUDHTA DENA.
HAMARE DHYAN MEIN AAO,PRABHU AAKHON MEIN BAS JAO,
ANDHERE DIL MEIN AA KAR KE PARAM JYOTI JAGA DENA.
BAHA DO PREM KI GANGA DILOMEIN PREM KA SAGAR,
HAMEIN AAPAS MEIN MILJUL KAR,PRABHU REHNA SIKHA DENA.
HAMARA KARAM HO SEVA HAMARA DHARMA HO SEVA
SADA IMAAN HO SEVA ,SEVAKCHAR BANA DENA.
VATAN KE VATE JEENA, VATAN KE VATE MARNA ,
VATAN PAR JAAN FIDA KARNA PRABHU HAMKO SIKHA DENA.
DAYA KAR DAAN BHAKTI KA HAMEN PARMATMA DENA ,
DAYA KARNA HAMARI AATMA MEIN SHUDHTA DENA.
Flag Song
BHARAT SCOUT GUIDES ZANDA OOCHA SADA RAHEGA,
OOCHA SADA RAHEGA ZANDA OOCHA SADA RAHEGA.
NEELA RANG GAGAN SA VISTRIT BHATRUBHAV FAILATA,
TRIDAL KAMAL NIT TEEN PRATIGAO KI YAAD DILATA.
AUR CHAKRA KEHTA HEIN PRATIPAL AAGA KADAM BADEGA ,
OOCHA SADA RAHEGA ZANDA OOCHA SADA RAHEGA.
BHARAT SCOUT GUIDES ZANDA OOCHA SADA RAHEGA.

What Is Good Turn


What Is a Good Turn?

A Good Turn is a volunteered kind act of good deed.  Boys must be encouraged to watch for things that need to be done, and then do them without being asked.  More, boys must be trained and educated into the Good Turn Habit.  They must be helped to see that doing a job which they are already supposed to do, even cheerfully , ought not be classed as doing a Good Turn. 
Performing the regular routine duties about the home is not a Good Turn.  The Good Turn is a bigger finer thing–the Good Turn is really a philosophy of living, of which Service to others becomes the key.  A good Turn is a volunteered kind act or deed.  If you can  stimulate a boy so that such actions become habitual, then you have made the Good Turn Philosophy work in his life. 
Such a process is a process of education, and will not be accomplished except by careful planning and by presenting the matter again and again under all sort of circumstances, and by yourself setting up and keeping in operation certain sorts of activities which will help the boy catch the idea and experience the thrill of the real Good Turn.

Kinds of Good Turns

Good Turns may be classed under different headings.  Complying with the regulations and rules of the school and school grounds is doing one’s duty, and not a Good Turn.  On the other hand the Scout who watches for things that need to be done, and volunteers his services to the janitor, teacher or principal, has rendered a real Good Turn.
Community Good Turns include picking up banana peels from sidewalks; removing broken glass and nails, etc., from streets; removing papers and boxes from sidewalks and highways; reporting street lamps not burning; garbage nuisances, etc., on streets is but doing one’s duty. and not a Good Turn.
Troop Good Turns mean going out of your way to help another Scout with his work, or helping him to live up to his Scout obligations.  Going to another Patrol or Troop to help with signaling, first aid instruction or other Scout work, or the Scoutmaster with outside work regularly assigned, constitutes a fine Good Turn.
There are Church Good Turns, and Good Turns to Animals and National Good Turnsand unlimited numbers of Individual Good Turns.  Most boys do not wish to speak of their individual Good Turns.  In this they should be encouraged.
Good Turns vary with every situation.  We shall try to list and classify suggestions which may be helpful for your Troop. The important thing is to keep forever the Good Turn idea in all of your own thinking and planning, giving it definite place and time. Otherwise it will soon drift into a mere superficiality and do more harm than good. Avoid any reward for Good Turns. Say to your boys:
“Just do something to help the other fellow, and the joy of the service well done will be its own reward.”
So you see the Good Turn habit has no end of avenues down which it may go.  There is scarcely a day or an hour, an event or a situation where there is not an opportunity to do a Good Turn.  The point is that boys must be trained to see these opportunities and to take real joy in making the most of the opportunity.

About Scout Founder Baden Powell

About Scout Founder Baden Powell




Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden Powell of Gilwell, known to millions by his magical initials B.P. Founder of the Boy Scout and Girl Guide Movement was born in London on the 22nd February 1857. He was the sixth son of professor H.G. Baden Powell and Henrietta Grace, daughter of Admiral William Smyth. Professor Baden Powell died when B.P. was three years old and the burden of bringing up the family, therefore, devolved entirely on Mrs. Baden Powell. She allowed them a good deal of freedom to go about and lean things for themselves. This early up-bringing gave B.P. the real start for his future life as a soldier and an outdoorsman.
        It was almost an accident that took him to the army. He was very popular with all the men and officers in the regiment. He was a great hoarse-man, an expert at polo and pig-sticking, clever at many kind of theatricals and play-acting and a skillful artist. He also did hard work at soldiering and rose rapidly to be a Captain in 1823.    


        To know how Scouting began we must go back a few years prior to the Siege of Mafeking. His army manual Aids to Scouting was being used in many schools and boys in outdoor activities. He collected together twenty boys, some from the Boys’ Brigade and others sons of his friends and held a camp for them on Brown Sea Island in Poole Harbor in August 1907. the camp was a great success and B.P. decided to write his now famous book Scouting for Boys. It was published in 1908 in six fortnightly parts. Boys everywhere began to buy up copies and to start Scouting on their own, asking likely men to become Scoutmasters. Thus Patrols and Troops began to spring up rapidly all over England, and B.P. was therefore, forced to retire from active service to look after the growth of this new youth movement. It is, in a way, correct to say that the boys themselves started the movement, because B.P. himself had only thought the he was giving out a scheme to be used by boys’ club and societies already in existence then.
    
Picture Of Scout Founder

What Is Scouting?

What Is Scouting?


SCOUTING IS…….


EDUCATION FOR LIFE

Scouting compliments the school and the family by developing self-knowledge, the need to explore, to discover, to want to know and to learn visual skills.


AN EXPERIENCE IN LEADERSHIP

Scouting offers young people a unique opportunity to be trained in leadership and to practice the acquired leadership skills. This is done by focussing on group work (patrols) and progressively allowing young people to take charge of (to lead) their groups.


BASED ON A SYSTEM OF VALUES

The Scout programme which promotes leadership is based on a system of values such as honesty, loyalty, obedience, cleanliness, trust, helpfulness, brotherhood, courtesy…


INTERNATIONAL

Scouting has never stopped growing since its founding in 1907. Today there are more than 16 million members in more than 150 countries and territories.


OPEN TO ALL

Scouting is open to all young men from the age of eight, in accordance with the purpose, principles and method conceived by its founder Robert Baden-Powell.


A CHALLENGE TO ADULTS

A chance to help young people develop. A way to improve the quality of our future society, while being of service, adult leaders get valuable training and experience, which is invaluable in their personal professional lives.


A method



MAKING A PERSONAL COMMITMENT

- to a simple code of living: the Scout Promise and Law.


LEARNING BY DOING

- active participation, with others


WORKING IN SMALL GROUPS

- in patrols to develop leadership, group skills, and individual responsibility


STIMULTING PROGRAMMES

- progressive activities based on the interests of young people. Activities in contact with nature, a ruch learning environment where simplicity, creativity and discovery come together to provide adventure and challenge.


A code of living

- A commitment to seek the spiritual value of life beyond the material world.


A SOCIAL DIMENSION

- participating in the development of society, respecting the dignity of others and the integrity of the natural world.
Promoting local, national and international peace, understanding and co-operation.


A PERSONAL DIMENSION

- developing a sense of personal responsibility and stimulating the desire for responsible self-expression



Left Hand Shake

Left Hand Shake

The left-handed Scout handshake is a formal way of greeting other Scouts of 
both genders used by members of Scout and Guide organizations around the 
world when greeting other Scouts. The handshake is made with the hand 
nearest the heart and is offered as a token of friendship. In most situations, 
the handshake is made firmly, without interlocking fingers, and many 
organizations only use this handshake when both people are in uniform.

Meaning of the left-hand

Various sources have attributed the origin of the handshake, as an ancient 
sign of bravery and respect, to Lord Baden-Powell‘s encounter after battle with 
Prempeh I, or to earlier published works by Ernest Thompson Seton. There 
exist various versions of the Prempeh story, all centering around African 
warriors using the left hand to hold their shields and to lower it and shake the 
left hand of the person was to show they trusted each other.

According to the Ashanti warrior version of the story, then-Colonel Baden-
Powell saluted them with his right hand, but the Ashanti chiefs offered their 
left hands and said, “In our land only the bravest of the brave shake hands 
with the left hand, because to do so we must drop our shields and our 
protection.” The Ashantis knew of Baden-Powell’s bravery because they had 
fought against him and with him, and they were proud to offer the left hand of 
bravery.
The left hand is also closer to the heart, with that attendant symbology.
Example For Left Hand Shake

Sunday, 7 April 2013

Scout Salute

Scout Salute

The three-finger salute is used by members of 
Scout and Guide organizations around the world when 
greeting other Scouts and in respect of a national flag 
at ceremonies. In most situations, the salute is made 
with the palm face out, the thumb holding down the 
little finger, and with the fingertips on the brow of the 
head.

Meaning of the three fingers


In his book, Scouting for Boys, Robert Baden-Powell 
chose the three-finger salute for Scouts to represent 
the three aspects of the Scout Promise:
1. Honour God and the King
2. Help Others
3. Obey the Scout Law
Example Of Scout Salute